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Christopher Robinson
Christopher Robinson

Where To Buy Cheap Backsplash


An even simpler DIY kitchen backsplash idea is to cut larger sheets of patterned vinyl based on the size of your backsplash and cover the backsplash area like wallpaper. The vinyl is super-wipeable, so it's a great alternative for areas that get hit with splatters. Blogger Landee Anderson employed this technique with a quatrefoil-patterned vinyl adhesive. The vinyl looks like an intricate tile or stencil design, but is actually a vinyl adhesive that is simply applied over a painted wall.




where to buy cheap backsplash



First, she painted the wall around her backsplash gray, then she measured and cut the adhesive vinyl and applied it after the paint had dried. Anderson actually sells the backsplash on her Etsy shop and has samples you can try for only a few bucks. Learn more about how she applied the vinyl here (there's even a video with instructions!).


One of the simplest ways to add an instant pop of color or brightness to your backsplash is to simply paint over the existing tile or drywall. This can be as simple as painting a dull brown tile a solid bright color, as they've done on the lifestyle site a Beautiful Mess.


Other popular pins demonstrate more complex painting techniques, where stenciling mimics the look of tile patterns, as shown in the photo above. Learn how to stencil a simple herringbone pattern in paint here.


Beadboard is an inexpensive and easily accessible material that will give your kitchen clean, bright white color. (This backsplash was done for $30 total!) Its white color and clean lines are great for creating an illusion of space in small kitchens, too. It can be installed easily, in one large sheet cut to fit the space of your backsplash. There's also no need to remove an existing backsplash, since beadboard is relatively lightweight and can be installed with glue or liquid nails over the existing material. And, if you don't want plain white, it's easy to paint! Pro tip: If you're painting your beadboard, use a durable, wipeable paint to make everyday kitchen clean-up easy.


Tiles are a classic backsplash material, but you don't need to go to all that trouble to achieve that look. Peel-and-stick faux tiles eliminate messy and time-consuming grout and tile work, and cut the cost of the project, too. These adhesive faux tiles are heat- and moisture-resistant, and easy to remove if you want to switch up your design in a year or two. You can find them in a clean and simple mock subway tile look on Amazon, in addition to damask patterns and more brightly colored versions.


Decorative metal roofing tiles are another great option for an economical and beautiful backsplash. These tin tiles can be purchased inexpensively at Home Depot. They look luxe, but they're actually affordable and easy to install over existing tile with heavy-duty glue, and easily cover any existing grout lines.


Peel and stick wallpaper sheets are inexpensive and very easy to apply as a great way to upgrade parts of your home that need a backsplash in minutes. Wallpaper backsplashes cost between $0.35 and $1.50 per square foot.


Glass backsplashes are versatile and offer many color and design options you like for a lower price than metal or marble backsplashes. It is easy to maintain and highly functional. Glass backsplashes cost $5 to $15 per square feet for materials and $7 to $20 per square feet for installation.


Wallpaper is a creative, cheap and straightforward solution, plus peel-and-stick varieties make a DIY install possible for experienced homeowners. Good-quality wallpaper is durable and wicks away moisture, but know that you may compromise on water resistance if you choose wallpaper as your backsplash. Wallpaper costs between $0.35 and $1.50 per square foot.


Glass tile is slightly more expensive and difficult to install. They are classy and add a high-end design element to your home. Glass tile backsplashes cost $3 to $15 per square foot.


Metal ceilings such as stainless steel tiles are fashionable to use on walls as backsplashes. They make a space look retro, especially for kitchens. Metal ceiling backsplashes cost $3 to $10 per square foot.


Marble is the priciest and most high-end of the tiles. They are easy to clean and maintain and make homes look beautiful, complimenting cabinets and countertops. Marble tile backsplashes cost $5 to $75 per square foot. Make sure to get advice from your hired installation pro on how to find the material at a discount since big box stores will charge a lot for this material.


Kitchen backsplashes are the most popular ways to beautify and elevate your home while protecting the walls. Marble tiles are the most aesthetically pleasing for the kitchen but is the most expensive option among the five above. A ceramic alternative to subway tile is another excellent option. Ceramic tile costs significantly less than traditional subway tile but can mimic the design well.


The best place to get cheap backsplashes is from online home improvement stores. Do your research and check reviews for the best stores before buying, but also compare online prices to local backsplash installers if you can get a discount on materials when booking an appointment for installation.


When looking for local backsplash installers, consider small retailers as well as big-box stores and independent contractors. Do some price comparing and decide which contractor to hire based on the price point and answers to the following questions:


If you're trying to cover up an unfortunate textured wall without going broke, or if you just want to infuse your kitchen with old-school charm, then a plank backsplash may be an easy and inexpensive solution for you. To create her crisp-looking backsplash, this resourceful blogger chose lauan plywood, which she cut to size and and attached to the wall using construction adhesive. Some waterproof caulk and a few coats of semigloss paint were all she needed to finish up this genuine showstopper.


Tile has a reputation of being a pricey material, which is why some homeowners avoid it. While tile can come with a big price tag, that's not always the case. Savvy shoppers know that shops like the Habitat ReStore offer deep discounts of donated tile. No matter where you source your tile, you can save a bundle by installing it yourself. If mortar and grout seems intimidating, consider a mess-free solution like the SimpleMat, which makes install faster, cleaner, and less of a hassle.


Stenciling is a great way to add some personal flair to walls, furniture, and even backsplashes. While there are plenty of ready-made stencils available, you can also purchase versions that allow you to fashion a custom design. Working in one small area at a time, paint your pattern in the colors of your choice for a finished product that's guaranteed to boost the style quotient of the busiest room of the house.


In our world of iPods and MP3 players, CDs have become a thing of the past. But there's no need to toss those Technicolor disks! Instead, consider repurposing your favorite tunes into a decorative DIY project, just like the clever creators of this mosaic backsplash did. Use plastic-cutting scissors to break the CDs into pieces, glue them in position, and then grout. You'll love how the finished product bounces colorful light around your kitchen.


Backsplashes are stylish and add character to your kitchen, and they also function to prevent stains and splatters from covering your bare wall. Tile is the most popular backsplash choice, but if you want to give your kitchen a less traditional look, there are plenty of backsplash alternative options to suit both light and dark cabinets.


Remodeling an outdated or boring bathroom can be very expensive. If you're looking to refresh the look of your bathroom without blowing a wad of money, install a colorful new backsplash above your bathroom sink. A backsplash can serve as a focal point for the room while it protects the wall above the sink from water damage.


Tile is a classic choice for a backsplash, but the material can be expensive and a hassle to install. Luckily, there's a wide variety of affordable self-adhesive tiles available for a quick, stress-free backsplash project. Self-adhesive faux ceramic tiles come in vivid colors and patterns for a fresh, bright look. If you want a more subtle, upscale feel, you can purchase linoleum sheets made to look like stone. Self-adhesive metal tiles are even a possibility, albeit a more expensive one.


Instead of installing a traditional backsplash, try painting above the sink. You can use traditional paint in a bold color, or try a faux-finish spray paint made to give a terracotta or sandstone finish. Iron oxide paint will provide increased durability. You can even use chalkboard paint in either the normal or magnetic variety for a whimsical touch. If you're using traditional paint, just be sure to use a semigloss or another easy-to-clean finish, or apply a protective varnish over the top.


A small area like a backsplash is the perfect place to use flashy or intricate designs that would be too much on an entire wall. If you've fallen in love with a wallpaper pattern that you're afraid to use on the wall, a backsplash might be just the place for it. You can even get vinyl-based temporary wallpaper that will peel right off when you feel like a change. Be sure to choose a wallpaper that's durable and water-resistant.


These peel and stick backsplash tiles are an easy and inexpensive way to update your kitchen or bathroom in minutes! With chic designs like white marble and Tuscan tile, the self adhesive tiles look like the real thing! We even have the classic subway tile backsplash with grey grout, perfect for a farmhouse. Backplash by the Tile Backsplash by the Panel Backsplash by the Roll View asGriditem selectedListSort by PositionName: A to ZName: Z to APrice: Low to HighPrice: High to LowNewDisplay 244896144 per pageFilter by: 041b061a72


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